Keeping your teen safe during the 100 deadliest days of summer

Keeping your teen safe during the 100 deadliest days of summer

On Behalf of | Jun 21, 2021 | Motor Vehicle Accidents |

From Memorial Day to Labor Day, more teenage drivers die in car accidents than during any other time of the year. Although the fact that teens in Alabama are not in school and behind the wheel more often may be partially to blame, many of the accidents can be attributed to inexperience, distracted driving and other factors. These tips can help you keep your teen driver safe during the summer months.

Fewer teen passengers

There is evidence that when a teen driver has only teen passengers, they are 51% more likely to become a traffic fatality. That statistic drops to only 8% when drivers over the age of 35 are in the car with a teen driver. This may be because teens may encourage other teens to make poor decisions behind the wheel, like driving over the speed limit or engaging in distractions that could result in an accident.

Speeding and texting

A survey conducted by AAA found that 47% of teens admitted to driving more than 10 miles per hour over the posted speed limit while 35% admitted to texting while driving, both actions that can lead to car accidents. In some cases, teens are simply parroting what they see their own parents do when they are driving. If you tend to drive over the speed limit or text while you are driving, there is a higher chance that your teen will do the same things. Lead by example and put your phone in the backseat or the trunk. Always drive the speed limit, especially with your teen and even younger children in the car because they will watch what you do.

Drowsy driving

Another factor that can lead to teen car accidents is driving while they are sleepy. Late night studying, a part-time job that requires them to work late night hours or just not getting adequate rest can lead your teen to make a mistake behind the wheel. If you know your teen has been up late studying, drive them where they need to be rather than allow them to get behind the wheel. Offer to pick them up from work when you know they have been awake more hours than they should. These actions could prevent your child from being a car accident victim.